fax
 

FAXABLE LETTERS FOR BUDGET ADVOCACY DAY

You can use the template letters below to create your fax to Governor Cuomo and your New York State Legislators.

 

GOVERNOR CUOMO

You can fax the Governor's Office at 518-457-3087.

The sample letter is available below, or you can download a copy: Sample Letter To Governor Cuomo

February 9, 2016

The Honorable Andrew M. Cuomo
Governor of New York State
NYS State Capitol Building
Albany, NY 12224

Dear Governor Cuomo,

Today is the New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s Budget Advocacy Day and I’m joining with hundreds of domestic violence advocates all over the state contacting our representatives to share a number of our concerns regarding the New York State budget. I am writing on behalf of {name of organization} and the {number} of victims of domestic violence that we serve each year. We ask that you work with the Legislature to ensure no survivor of domestic violence is ever turned away from the services they seek, and that New York State begins to meaningfully invest in primary prevention so that we can stem the tide of violence and stop it before it starts.

The preliminary 2015 New York State Domestic Violence Census[1] numbers are staggering. New York State has the highest demand for domestic violence services in the country. Here are just a few of the numbers:

  • In just one day, 6,950 victims were served. Of these, 3,239 received non-residential services.
  • 956 survivors’ requests for services went unmet because of critical funding and staffing shortages
  • 148 individual service options for survivors in New York State were reduced or eliminated during 2015
  • 115 staff  positions, most of which were direct service advocates, were reduced or eliminated during 2015

In light of these troubling numbers, we ask that you ensure the following items are prioritized in the final budget:

1. Help shore up long standing gaps in operational funding as a result of flat or reduced state investment by:

  • Providing $6 million in TANF funding for non-residential domestic violence services; and
  • Providing  at least a 3% increase in the domestic violence shelter per diem rate.

2. Create a primary prevention funding stream for domestic violence services in New York by establishing a $17.25 million fund in the public protection budget that will be dispersed through coordinated support to NYSCADV and local domestic violence programs statewide. Research has shown the cost of a single homicide can be well over $17.25 million - we are requesting funds at this level to demonstrate New York State’s commitment to preventing far-reaching tragedies of domestic violence homicides in the coming years[2].

3. Restore and increase funding for critical civil legal services for domestic violence victims statewide in order to address the high demand for civil legal services by survivors of domestic violence.

4. Provide $4.5 million in funding for local domestic violence programs to provide support to colleges and universities that the recent Enough Is Enough campus policy mandates for stalking and domestic violence services (to compliment the $4.5 million already provided in support for rape crisis programs for sexual assault prevention).

We urge both you and the Legislature to continue your commitment to victims of domestic violence by incorporating these changes into the final state budget. Our statewide membership organization, the New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NYSCADV), can provide more information regarding these positions and provide suggestions for resolution - you can contact Connie Neal, Executive Director, at 518-482-5465 x208 or cneal@nyscadv.org.

Sincerely,

{Name}

{Title}

[1] National Network to End Domestic Violence (2015) Domestic Violence Counts – DRAFT New York Summary.

[2] Delisi, Kosloski, Sween, et. al. 2010. Murder by Numbers: Monetary Costs Imposed by a Sample of Homicide Offenders. The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology. 21(4). P 501-503.

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 NEW YORK STATE LEGISLATURE

To ensure the strongest impact, we're asking everyone to call / email /fax / tag the following legislative leaders (contact information is available by clicking on their name):

First, you need to identify who your representative is and get their fax number. You can do that by visiting the following links:

You may use the sample letter below download a copy here: Sample Letter To New York State Legislators 

February 9, 2016

 The Honorable {Legislator’s full name}

{Building / Street}

Albany, NY {ZIP}

Dear {Assemblymember / Senator + last name},

Today is the New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s Budget Advocacy Day and I’m joining with hundreds of domestic violence advocates all over the state contacting our representatives to share a number of our concerns regarding the New York State budget. I am writing on behalf of {name of organization} and the {number} of victims of domestic violence that we serve each year. We ask that you work with the Governor to ensure no survivor of domestic violence is ever turned away from the services they seek, and that New York State begins to meaningfully invest in primary prevention so that we can stem the tide of violence and stop it before it starts.

The preliminary 2015 New York State Domestic Violence Census[1] numbers are staggering. New York State has the highest demand for domestic violence services in the country. Here are just a few of the numbers:

  • In just one day, 6,950 victims were served. Of these, 3,239 received non-residential services.
  • 956 survivors’ requests for services went unmet because of critical funding and staffing shortages
  • 148 individual service options for survivors in New York State were reduced or eliminated during 2015
  • 115 staff  positions, most of which were direct service advocates, were reduced or eliminated during 2015

In light of these troubling numbers, we ask that you ensure the following items are prioritized in the final budget:

1. Help shore up long standing gaps in operational funding as a result of flat or reduced state investment by:

  • Providing $6 million in TANF funding for non-residential domestic violence services; and
  • Providing  at least a 3% increase in the domestic violence shelter per diem rate.

2. Create a primary prevention funding stream for domestic violence services in New York by establishing a $17.25 million fund in the public protection budget that will be dispersed through coordinated support to NYSCADV and local domestic violence programs statewide. Research has shown the cost of a single homicide can be well over $17.25 million - we are requesting funds at this level to demonstrate New York State’s commitment to preventing far-reaching tragedies of domestic violence homicides in the coming years[2].

3. Restore and increase funding for critical civil legal services for domestic violence victims statewide in order to address the high demand for civil legal services by survivors of domestic violence.

4. Provide $4.5 million in funding for local domestic violence programs to provide support to colleges and universities that the recent Enough Is Enough campus policy mandates for stalking and domestic violence services (to compliment the $4.5 million already provided in support for rape crisis programs for sexual assault prevention).

We urge both you and the Governor to continue your commitment to victims of domestic violence by incorporating these changes into the final state budget. Our statewide membership organization, the New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NYSCADV), can provide more information regarding these positions and provide suggestions for resolution - you can contact Connie Neal, Executive Director, at 518-482-5465 x208 or cneal@nyscadv.org.

Sincerely,

{Name}

{Title}

[1] National Network to End Domestic Violence (2015) Domestic Violence Counts – DRAFT New York Summary.

[2] Delisi, Kosloski, Sween, et. al. 2010. Murder by Numbers: Monetary Costs Imposed by a Sample of Homicide Offenders. The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology. 21(4). P 501-503.