PUBLIC POLICY & LEGISLATIVE ADVOCACY

PUBLIC POLICY & LEGISLATIVE ADVOCACY

Promote Justice. Protect Rights. Prevent Domestic Violence.

The New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NYSCADV) provides input, guidance and leadership to State and Federal government officials and staff regarding budgetary, policy and legislative matters affecting victims of domestic violence and their children.

New York State’s system of funding and oversight of domestic violence programs is antiquated, having not been updated since it was established more than 30 years ago. Governor Andrew Cuomo is committed to abolishing outdated policies to ensure victims in need of shelter and other services are able to obtain the support they need immediately and without conditions.

Many reforms proposed in the Governor’s FY 2019-2020 Executive Budget will likely take some time to implement. But New York’s survivors need support and assistance now. New York has the highest demand for domestic violence services in the country.

We’re asking that the State Legislature support the following budget requests:

1)      Funds for domestic violence residential programs have been flat for years. An additional $50 million of support is needed to fix the system. We urge the State Legislature to move toward this funding goal.

2)      Funding for non-residential domestic violence services in the State budget is at the same level it was 19 years ago when it was first proposed. We urge the Legislature to increase this funding to $6 million.

3)      We are asking the Legislature to provide $250,000 in the State budget to enable NYSCADV to provide state-wide coordination of domestic violence issues and represent domestic violence service providers during this critical time of assessment and re-visioning.

4)      We are requesting $4 million for primary prevention initiatives focused on stopping violence before it begins.

5)      We urge the State to revert to a system of monthly vouchering and payment, instead of the current quarterly process, so that domestic violence programs can maintain the cash flow they need to keep their doors open for survivors.

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