Maybe it's someone you heard about.

Maybe it's someone you love. 

Maybe it's you.

Whatever the reason, your commitment to supporting survivors of domestic violence - and your desire to do what it takes to keep it from ever happening in the first place - is clear.  At NYSCADV, our work is to create and support the social change necessary to prevent and confront all forms of domestic violence. We do this by providing training and technical assistance for local domestic violence programs across New York State, working with communities to change our culture into one that doesn't condone violence, and advocating for policies to make sure that survivors across our state are provided the support they need to get safe and heal. 

Show your support for survivors of domestic violence in New York State by donating to our Coalition. Every dollar you give to NYSCADV will go directly to sustain our work, and will make a tremendous difference in the lives of survivors and in the work of the domestic violence advocates who support them.

Twitter Feed

News & Blog

For three years in a row, New York State has had the highest demand for domestic violence services in the country. But what are the needs of survivors? What do advocates highlight from their experiences working with victims? October is domestic violence awareness month. It is a time when survivors come forward to share their stories, both directly and through the words of advocates. At the NYS Coalition Against Domestic Violence, we educate advocates, policy makers, and the public about victims' most pressing needs, both during abusive relationships and after they decide to leave. Join us in sharing these stories on social media platforms. Use the #NYDVAM & #DVAM2018 hashtags in your posts to highlight the amazing work happening all over the state to build awareness and prevent domestic violence.

Domestic violence is pervasive in our communities and as advocates, service providers, and allies we strive to prevent and address this issue which affects people of all walks of life. Thus, we must be cognizant of survivors’ respective identities and how these may impact their vulnerability to domestic violence. This paper contributes to advocacy work that seeks to prevent and end domestic violence. It focuses on African American women living in the United States, and how their unique experience with sexism and racism makes them particularly susceptible to domestic violence.